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I have a hypothesis I want to explore:

Requirements Risk management could be a useful approach to requirements analysis, and lead to better requirements management.

High level the idea goes like this:

  • Risk management is an important part of project management
  • Requirements management is also a critical part of the puzzle
  • Should we be running a requirements risk management process on our projects?

The purpose of this article is to introduce the topic of Requirements risk into the Requirements Management discussion. Feedback and commentary is welcome and can be provided at ModernAnalyst.com

Serious projects run risk management processes throughout their lifecycle. In fact, risk management is one of the nine knowledge areas of the PMI’s PMBOK, and one of several key processes in the (British) OGC’s P3M3 project, programme and portfolio management framework.

PM bodies obviously take risk management seriously, and it’s backed up by the academics. Studies are showing that a structured approach to risk management has a correlation with successful project delivery. Risk management is a vitally important part of project management.

I don’t need to explain the problem of requirements again. There are plenty of articles on the web about how poor project requirements management costs billions of dollars and lead to disappointment everywhere. Of course the best way to manage requirements is to put trained and experienced people on the job. Building up the knowledge areas and processes will also support the need to improve requirements management.

Author: Craig Brown
Craig Brown works as a Project Manager and Business Analyst.  He is an active contributor to Modern Analyst and runs his own blog called Better Projects.

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Requirements Simulation is a technique used to visually define and model business, user and technical requirements. The value proposition of most tools in the marketplace today is to bridge the communication gap between business and IT by empowering the Business Analyst to completely, and clearly define application requirements. Since specialized ...
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"Good specifications will improve programmer productivity far better than any programming tool or technique."
- Bryce's Law

INTRODUCTION

In terms of systems development, during the 1960's and early 1970's you were either a Systems Analyst or a Programmer. Period. At the time, there were substantially more analysts than programmers (at least a 2:1 ratio). This was due, in part, to the fact that computing was just coming into its own in the corporate world and there were still people around who could look at systems in its entirety. However, there was a screaming need for people to program computers and, as such, this became the boom years of programming. If you knew COBOL, Fortran, or PL/1 you could just about right your own ticket. Salaries were good, and you could intimidate your employer simply by what you knew (you had to commit something like murder to get fired). The emphasis on programming became so great that authors rushed out voluminous books to increase programmer productivity, hence the birth of the Structured Programming movement of the late 1970's, which was followed shortly thereafter by the CASE movement (Computer Aided Software Engineering).

Author: Tim Bryce

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Business analysis is about more than software development. It can help business leaders to understand the business and develop resourcing, training and IT strategies. Through careful analysis of workflows and business processes you can identify opportunities for increasing efficiency and profitability. You can use business analysis techniques to help you identify potential processing bottlenecks or under-utilisation of costly resources.

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Business analysts go by many titles one of them being Management Consultant.  In this article, Tony Jacowski talks about the management consulting career.

Author: Tony Jacowski

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In the first two installments of this series, we saw why BPMN is important to the Business Process Expert and got an overview of the notation. In this part, we’ll look beyond the spec to suggest some best practices for making your BPMN models most effective. The art of effective process modeling depends on what you are trying to do. Unlike traditi...
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In the first installment of this series, we saw why BPMN is important to the Business Process Expert. In this part, we’ll look at the notation itself. In BPMN there are only three first-class diagram elements, or flow objects:  Activity, a rounded rectangle, representing work performed in the process  Gateway, a diamond, r...
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Business process management (BPM) is an emerging discipline that looks at the enterprise in a radically new way. Instead of trying to automate and optimize individual functional units, like sales, supply chain, and customer service, in isolation, BPM views your company from the perspective of end-to-end cross-functional processes – exactly the way ...
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What Is A Functional Specification? Functional specifications (functional specs), in the end, are the blueprint for how you want a particular web project or application to look and work. It details what the finished product will do, how a user will interact with it, and what it will look like. By creating a blueprint of the product first, time an...
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Agile analysis is being spoken of more and more frequently in the world of business analysts. This form of analysis is becoming more and more popular as the next generation of business owners comes into play. It is a more hands on approach to the business analysis. There is more communication. Face to face discussions occur more frequently. E-mails and faxes are becoming few and far between. So what is agile analysis?

Author: Tony de Bree

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The qualified business analyst wears many hats. He or she is a negotiator, a skilled listener, a motivational speaker, and a team leader. His or her title may include that of systems analyst, requirements analyst, or project manager. The business analyst may or may not have a degree in business analysis. He or she may not be able to write code. However, the business analyst is educated in the process necessary to produce the code. He or she may even come from an IT department. But what is it they do?

Author: Tony de Bree

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There are several key points one needs to understand before deciding whether or not to become a business analyst. You may be qualified to do the job you were hired to do. Yet is it the job you wanted to do? Some analysts find themselves locked in a cubical writing reports all day, only to find the report was not used or even read. They realize they are in a dead end job going no-where fast. This is not the usual dream one has when becoming a business analyst.

Author: Tony de Bree

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A use case study is designed to describe a situation in which the program is being utilized by the end user. It will tell a story of sorts describing how the program works and the input of the user. It does not tell how the program was developed. The details of the programming are not included in the use case study. You are trying to express the concept behind the creation.

Author: Tony de Bree

24929 Views
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The role of a business analyst can be very difficult. He or she must wade through the mass of information presented to determine the underlying problems. This information may or may not be correct. The business analyst much research to comprehend the true situation of the business. The information supplied to the business analyst is given from many perspectives. Opinions can influence how one perceives the related issues. At times, the opinions can add unrelated information which only complicates the role of a business analyst.

Author: Tony de Bree

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Business analyst is not a new term in the business world. It has become extremely popular over the past few years. With businesses expanding world wide more emphasis has been put on the IT teams and departments to monitor and or expand with corporate peers. This has brought about changes in how business operates. A need for business analysis and systems analysts was born. Stakeholders wanted to know the money being spent was worth the expenditure. They needed someone to come in and tell them where to invest within the company to raise profits. The business analyst job was created.

Author: Tony de Bree

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