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New Post 12/19/2011 5:52 AM
User is offline Tony Markos
493 posts
5th Level Poster


Re: Use Case Extension Points and Alternative Flow 

Kimbo:

You bring up the very important point of the need to partition.  Analysis of systems is mainly about partitioning.

 What guides an analyst using Use Cases through a logicial partitioning?

Thanks,

Tony

 

 
New Post 12/20/2011 1:19 AM
User is offline Kimbo
450 posts
5th Level Poster


Re: Use Case Extension Points and Alternative Flow 

 Hi Tony,

Happy holidays (as you say, we just say Merry Christmas!)

Ummm, partitioning. To me that happens before the Use Cases are defined. I use process and partition the processes based on the business and what I'm trying to convey. Use cases are just the activities on the processes. In fact, I start with defining the processes and this drives out the activities that are involved in the processes. From this comes the use cases, business rules, business domain (logical data). I get the actual textual requirements first (or at the same time or sometimes never if there isn't time).

You work from data with the DFD approach. I sometimes use that but more often other ways to partition e.g. time, business function.

So explain what your approach is. Expect the folks out there are curious.

Kimbo

 
New Post 12/20/2011 8:43 AM
User is offline Tony Markos
493 posts
5th Level Poster


Re: Use Case Extension Points and Alternative Flow 

Kimbo:

To partition a system (manual, automated, or combo) - especially a larger scale system:

*  I use the data flow diagramming approach of "interviewing the data".  That is, I follow data flows as  they naturally combine or split apart.   When data flows logically combine or split apart, I have discovered a logical process/function. 

 (Note:  In the actual drawing of a diagram, whether I physically draw a process first or not is no issue - the key is to think of data flows first and then let the data flows flush out essential process/functions.)

*  I supplement the above by evaluating the resulting interface complexity.   If a given process has more than five total inputs and outputs, it is a red flag that that process needs to be further partitioned.  

 *  I ensure that I am focused on the unchanging business data flows, not on any implementation specific flows. For larger scale efforts, just coming up with a comprehensive, integrated understanding of the essentials is tough enough - trying to, at the same time, think implementation is a killer. 

*  Whether a logical data flow happens within a computer or happens between people MAKES NO DIFFERENCE.   For some reason, alot of BA's think that if the logical (not physical) data flow is within a computer, that needs to be handled differently than if the  flow is manual.   Such artifical partitioning  kills larger scale integration efforts.

Tony

 
New Post 12/22/2011 2:42 AM
User is offline Kimbo
450 posts
5th Level Poster


Re: Use Case Extension Points and Alternative Flow 

 Hi Tony,

What do you mean by "interface complexity"?

Absolutely agree about our work being implementation / solution independent and also about a lot / most BAs going straight to solution without modelling the business first.

Looks like we've been violently in agreement for all these years after all :-)

Kimbo

 
New Post 12/22/2011 6:46 AM
User is offline Tony Markos
493 posts
5th Level Poster


Re: Use Case Extension Points and Alternative Flow 

Kimbo:

Essential interfaces between processes functions are the  buisness data flows.  analysis

We are in total agreement:  Business Analysis is about analyzing the business (Duh).   

Tony

 
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