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New Post 1/17/2014 11:08 AM
User is offline blasto
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Best way to graph/draw an ETL data flow 
Modified By Chris Adams  on 1/21/2014 12:37:51 PM)

 I am re-posting this stackoverflow question on behalf of a poster -http://stackoverflow.com/questions/21193833/best-way-to-graph-an-etl-data-flow 

I found the following Version 1 in one of our detailed design documents. If I were going to create it, I would have probably displayed it as shown in Version 2

However, I'm thinking that there probably is a more common standard way of showing the flow of data by programs acting on it and that, while I prefer version 2, it probably is unnconventional and non-standard.

In Version 1, programs are shown as boxes. In Version 2, programs are depicted as arrows indicating that they are moving data from one table to another.

Q: What is the better more accepted way? Sequence Diagrams? If Sequence Diagrams were used, I think it wouldn't show the flow of data from one table to the next as well...

Version 1:

 

Version 2:

 

 
New Post 2/28/2014 2:12 PM
User is offline A
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Re: Best way to graph/draw an ETL data flow 

This has been up for a while, but I'll take a swing at it.  Years ago when I did ETL work (Business Objects, SSIS), we would model our flows before working them up.  Your flows certainly work, but one suggestion I might make is to differentiate the process flow from the data flow.  The goal is to make sure people (especially those who come after you to maintain the job!) can understand and follow the diagram.  I simplified your items and didn't model the EAST process flow, but you'll figure out what you want to do.

 
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