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New Post 9/19/2013 5:50 PM
User is offline pathfinder
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Newbie-career advice 

 I am a science graduate and havent been able to move ahead in my field, so want a career change and thinking about BA. But there are lot of questions before i  head for this transition and would be glad if someone already in the field can guide me.

1. I know being a BA you have to have good communication skills, but how about travel? is it a lot or little? 

2. what is the difference between a BA and a System analyst?

3. Since I have no technical or business knowledge, I am thinking on studying Management Information systems. Any suggestions on that and anything else i can do to gain knowledge and experience while studying.

 
New Post 10/8/2013 8:25 AM
User is offline Delinquent
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Re: Newbie-career advice 
I've been working in BA BPA fields since 1998 so, I'll try to answer as complete as I can, taking into account that I am situated in the UK. I have worked in a variety of roles and communication is essential, you need to be able to listen, analyse and in fact sell an idea, process or change to end users, management and other levels of hierarchy. You will experience resistance at all of these levels as some people feel threatened by you and there is always the fear that you will make a business are more efficient by getting rid of them so winning people over is a must. BA and BSA are pretty much the same person if you look at the overall objective look at business functions, systems and processes as the same thing or that's what I've experienced. Terminology may be different to where you are and every job is different, I'll wait to be corrected by someone with more experience in the BSA arena. Information Management... I studied this as part of my BA (Hons) degree and can say that it has been invaluable for my career, it is important to understand how information is used, an what is generally accepted at transaction, decision making levels and executive stages but to be honest, it was a module in my first year and I could read a book now and get as much out of it as I can. That being said having a degree in that field isn't going to hurt you especially if you want to specialise in that area. Personally I concentrate in credit / risk / collections and can say that this knowledge that I learnt has helped me. As for other knowledge, look at the BCS website and the ISEB Business Analyst Diploma, there are American equivalents that may be better but these are things you can be getting whilst you study say perhaps one module a semester. Experience well, without the background, why not try to change your current role if working to include more business analysis skills, perhaps with a view to changing your role completely, speak with your manager regarding this. You could contact non-profit organisations, come in and see if you can map out their processes, identify efficiencies, project manage the changes etc. There are loads of opportunities you just have to make them. Delinquent
 
New Post 10/8/2013 10:06 AM
User is offline Delinquent
3 posts
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Re: Newbie-career advice 

Mmm, who done the specs for this website? You know you can take the character for return in a textbox and parse it as a "
" into the database.

Instead of making me looking like an illiterate chimpanzee for not using paragraphs.

 
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