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Articles and White Papers
Tuesday, November 20, 2007
26383 Views 1 Comments 62 members voted Article Rating

There are several key points one needs to understand before deciding whether or not to become a business analyst. You may be qualified to do the job you were hired to do. Yet is it the job you wanted to do? Some analysts find themselves locked in a cubical writing reports all day, only to find the report was not used or even read. They realize they are in a dead end job going no-where fast. This is not the usual dream one has when becoming a business analyst.

A good business analyst is creative, a people person. Someone wanting a more hands on approach to business and problem solving. The good business analyst will look for opportunities to grow and learn. He or she will listen attentively to what others are saying. The good business analyst is like a walking encyclopedia about the company he or she works within. They will know people from every department.

The good business analyst may be a part of the IT team or department. He or she may even be able to produce usable code for practical remedies to small tasks. He or she will understand technology and the jargon that leaves the common layperson confused.

What makes a good business analyst is the ability to listen to what is being said and hear what is not. The good business analyst can read into the meaning of stakeholders words. He or she can understand the needs being expressed when the stakeholders do not always know what they are. The good business analyst will be able to determine if the requests from stakeholders or end users are viable. In some cases they are not and it is up to the business analyst to inform what can be done versus what is wanted.

The good business analyst will have information available about the latest technology. He or she will know the formulas or programs used by corporate peers. The good business analyst will be able to recognize trends and differentiate between them and fads. They will understand the end user market.

The good business analyst will understand people. He or she will be a motivational person who can gear people into wanting to complete a project. The good business analyst will be able to point out someone's strengths and help to build on those. He or she will recognize when a person is having a conflict and try to help resolve the issue. He or she may even be able to create teamwork within separate departments to meet a goal or deadline.

The good business analyst commands respect because he or she gives respect. You will not find the good business analyst spreading rumors or gossiping. He or she will squelch the first signs of trouble and stand up for what he or she believes in. There is no room for garbage in the office.

The good business analyst is a visionary, a creative thinker, and innovative. He or she is fun to work with and carries a positive attitude. Very few people do not like the good business analyst.

Author: Tony de Bree 


Tony de Bree has been a part-time freelancer since 1985. Besides his work on projects with large Global companies and small companies, he writes (e)books and articles and organises workshops on how you can earn money by being different from the rest as a part-time or full-time freelancer.  You can reach him at www.onlinefreelancingsecrets.com.

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COMMENTS

Posted on Sunday, October 19, 2008 6:20 AM by
mona
interesting article :).
may i ask what is the first step to be a successful business analyst i mean if you want to switch your career ? from where to start?

many thanks
mona
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